Happy Birthday Musings!


On this very date, in the year 2012, Monique’s Musings was conceived in a hotel room in Nigeria. I was returning home via Calabar from the Farafina Trust Workshop and was convinced by a friend of a friend to blog my ‘think pieces’ (which I had self-published as a newsletter and sold for 100 francs each). This friend helped me use my Gmail account to setup on blogger, and I posted my first blog post on the 26th of August 2012.

Today, 60 blog-posts and tens of thousands of page views later I’m still sharing thoughts on here, and proud of how the challenge of producing something every month has evolved my writing as well as helped me engage with broad-minded readers and thinkers.


On the occasion of this anniversary, I want to say thank you to followers and readers for encouraging me to use this platform to express myself and present my point of view on all manner of things. In celebration of this anniversary, I looked up my blog stats on my most read blog posts.This month you’re invited to look back at the top 5 Monique’s Musings’ most-read blog posts of all time.


  1. What’s happening in Cameroon? Learning, I hope
I was surprised to find that this was the most-read blog post of all time, the reason being that it’s not that old. Still, as that the matter it deals with- the ongoing Anglophone crisis in Cameroon- is still a trending issue, I can easily understand why. In this post, I attempted to outline the sequence of events which brought us to the crisis and argue neither government nor revolutionaries are blameless.
  1. An Open Letter to Cameroonians
The second most popular blog post was expected. My 2014 Open Letter to Cameroonians is the rant in which I call us all out for our role in creating the sorry state of this country. It is also the post with the most comments. Obviously, Cameroonians responded to my letter.
  1. Why I am NOT Here for TB Joshua’s Ministry
This one was equally unsurprising. This post gave me my first experience with trolls as received so many insults and attacks for this post, obviously, it was being well read. Or perhaps misinterpreted. In this post, I took on the proliferation of Prophets and argued from a Christian perspective the danger of following a ministry like TB Joshua’s.
  1. Murdering Poverty: A Review
I have vowed to encourage Cameroonian writers by promoting their work through book reviews. Thus far I have reviewed three books by contemporary Cameroonian writers including Budji Kefen and Imbolo Mbue. This review of Arrey Elvis Ntui’s Murdering Poverty made it to the top 5 of most read blog posts. Check it out and do get your hands on a copy if you’re interested in development work and the theories shaping the practice.
  1. So What is Cameroon Famous For?
In this fifth most read blog-post I made an attempt at giving my fellow Cameroonians something to mention when faced with the many foreigners who are unaware of anything other than Eto’o and our reputation for corruption.


Which of my posts (if any) did you particularly like? Drop a comment below with your favorite- or your least favorite lol!

Perhaps you’re new here and now interested in reading more of my posts? A few I hold close to heart include; my piece on my becoming a writer, my second travelogue upon arriving the UK where I speak to Cameroonians on the false assumptions of the ‘bushfaller life’, my letter to fellow women on recognizing (and shunning) their own sexism, the one where I outline feminism for Men’s Empowerment, yet another where I outline what I love most about my country (and why you should love it too), and last but not least, this rant I posted on the justifiable anger of black people triggered by the shooting of Mike Brown.

Whether you're new or not, do join me in wishing a ‘happy birthday’ to this brainchild of mine. As always you're encouraged to leave comments with your thoughts on my posts past, present and those you hope for in future. 
I am always eager to read from the reader :) 




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